Why all Dental Software is not created Equal

Software Permeates everything we Do

It’s no simple task to develop software to perform wide-ranging business and clinical tasks-while at the same time meeting government and industry requirements. In addition, simplicity must be at the heart of all user interfaces. We’ll get into why this matters below.

Patrick Clyne, president of MacPractice, has been developing dental software for three decades. Beginning in 2004, Patrick, together with Mark Hollis, CEO, developed MacPractice DDS, the first dental software developed for Mac OS X. MacPractice has also had many.

efficiencyLet’s face it. Running a dental practice can be Rube Goldbergesque, especially if you accept insurance, bill for both dental and medical procedures, pay associates based upon collections, etc. You want your software to be easy and simple to use and learn.

While MacPractice does not have the luxury of designing a one-trick-pony like iTunes, Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, they do follow the evolving Apple master guidelines, making MacPractice familiar to Mac, iPhone, and iPad users-that’s most of us. Most importantly, this makes it easy for someone who knows MacPractice basics to quickly pick up new features like digital radiography, charting, and secure messaging.

MacPractice’s designers and owners have listened and responded to thousands of requests from their users. The trick is to respond to requests and government and industry requirements and yet avoid feature bloat and unnecessary complication.

Users can communicate suggestions, which MacPractice records and tracks, from anywhere from within MacPractice DDS without interrupting workflow. MacPractice also involves an advisory committee that includes corporate trainers and MacPractice practice consultants who have provided onsite training and service for more than 25 years to hundreds of clients. The advisory committee relays valuable, timely input from the users they work with onsite daily. This way, thousands of dentists are directly and indirectly involved in establishing and verifying requirements, in reviewing proposed designs, in providing further input, and in anticipating and addressing unintended consequences.

The development team is broken into squads, each tasked with a specific functionality. “Product owners” who lead the squads meet with Patrick, Mark, a project manager, the director of development, and a documentation specialist at least once a week to coordinate. Additionally, the open floor plan at MacPractice lends itself to ongoing and frequent collaboration.

MacPractice believes that built-in capabilities produce a superior user experience. While the software integrates with all major digital imaging solutions, most MacPractice users actually work with radiographs and photos inside MacPractice.

MacPractice developers incorporate every Apple technology as it is introduced, and the team updates their intercommunicating native apps for iPad and iPhone to work with new versions of MacPractice for El Capitan, for example.

dental software scheduleMacPractice has also taken a novel approach to those online services that are offered in bundles by so many competing vendors. Tight integration makes for more effective, efficient, lower-cost services that do not require the purchase of a bundle, and also makes for a better user experience.

MacPractice is a tight-knit, family-like group dedicated to making the best and simplest dental software. From personal experience, I can tell you that it helps me run my practice efficiently every single day.

Beginning in 2004, Patrick, together with Mark Hollis, CEO, developed MacPractice DDS, the first dental software developed for Mac OS X. MacPractice has also had many. While MacPractice does not have the luxury of designing a one-trick-pony like iTunes, Word, Excel, or PowerPoint, they do follow the evolving Apple master guidelines, making MacPractice familiar to Mac, iPhone, and iPad users-that’s most of us. Users can communicate suggestions, which MacPractice records and tracks, from anywhere from within MacPractice DDS without interrupting workflow. MacPractice also involves an advisory committee that includes corporate trainers and MacPractice practice consultants who have provided onsite training and service for more than 25 years to hundreds of clients. While the software integrates with all major digital imaging solutions, most MacPractice users actually work with radiographs and photos inside MacPractice. Look at this cyberthebot.com